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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it seems unbelievable. if it seems such, it just may be. elizabeth cohen joins me live to answer to this miracle. you know, i thought this might be a first-time thing. but it's happened a few times before. double arm transplants. how do they do it? it seems so intricate. >> they have to reconnect everything. you can imagine, this is surgery done at times with a microstop. you're reconnecting -- microscope. you're reconnecting every muscle, every tendon, every nerve. and you're connecting blood vessels. if that limb doesn't get blood, that limb will die. i was just on the phone with a surgeon who's done these before. he said that is the part that really makes you sweat is when you have to put that circulatory system back together. so okay oh is the seventh person -- marrocco is the seventh person to have this double arm transplant. the surgeon told me the biggest part of success is what part of the arm the transplant is done. the closer to the wrist the better. in simple terms, the more of the arm you have to transplant, the more difficult the task is. and brendan's actually, it's
expert aaron cohen says they shouldn't get u.s. aid. but it does, even now, why? >> well, i mean, neil... problem is we are sending millions if not billions of dollars into libya. the aid needs to be cut off. the reason why is because the attack that we saw -- this natural gas factory or refinery, which happens to sit on the libyan border, the weapons that were recovered by the algerian security forces were the exact same collection of kalashnikov rifles and the belgian-made land mieps and the c-5 rocket launchers, made famous by the libyan militias, these exact models were recovered by the algerian security forces, which means they came from the stockpiles amassed by momar cadoffy and looted by arms traffickers and are freely moving back and forth on this north african border, which is completely wide open for traffickers and militias,. >> neil: leaving aside our pouring good money after bad, in which we have committed tens of billions of dollars and in the case of egypt, then give mon tote new government that hates us even more, i am wondering, in light of today's developments from b
african american to run for san francisco mayor in 1963. district supervisor malia cohen helped push for the bar landmark status. >> we were discussing politics. debating any kind of social matter. there was a loved one lost. everyone seemed to congregate around sam jordan this. >>reporter: week generation of customers gathering to celebrate the bar 54 years of operation. including historic preservation consultant who volunteered his help with the landmark process. >> i have just always believed in using landmark program to recognize cull tawrl history. >>reporter: more than the building itself the designation honor life and walk of sam jordan who died in 2003. >> i think he would be most proud that the family is still involved keeping this legacy going. >>reporter: in san francisco, carolyn, abc 7 news. >> historic landmark. larry in new orleans covering the superbowl. rick is here. >> randy most usually doesn't talk to the media. >> right. he did today. >> he kauls caused a stir. coming up in sports. after behaving himself the entire season. moss raises eyebrow at superb
-old boy is wondering how this common treatable virus could take the life of their son. elizabeth cohen is joining us. she spent the morning with the family. elizabeth, how did this happen? >> reporter: wolf, it was such an emotional morning. i'm in front of the church that the family attends. mack was 17. that personified who he was. as you said, perfectly healthy. on december 21st he started feeling sick, a headache, a little bit tired. he had a fever but really no big deal and he was better in about two days and he then he felt fine for a while. and then a couple days later he started feeling bad again. his parents took him to a local hospital in the rural area they were in and they said he's got the flu and his kidneys are failing. they said, we have to get him to a bigger hospital. they put him on a helicopter and this is what max said to his mother as he was getting on the helicopter. >> one of the last coherent things he said, he looked at me and tears were rolling down his face. >> he was scared. >> he said, mom, i'm scared. i said, i know, buddy. i am, too. he said, mom, it's g
israeli prime minister ariel sharon is active. coming up next, elizabeth cohen explains what this could possibly mean. red lobster's 30 shrimp. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food differently. just $11.99. offer ends soon! ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ male announcer ] engine light on? come to meineke now for a free code scan read and you'll say...my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> after seven years in a coma, former world leader is now showing signs of brain activity. ariel sharon became prime minister of israel back in 2001. he was a major player in the 2003 talks, called for a palestinian state, but then in 2006 he suffered a massive stroke and brain hemorrhage that put him in a vegetative state. well, today his doctors say that sharon appeared to respond to his son's voice
correspondent scott cohen joins me now. good evening. >> good evening, larry. it is a big problem. enough so now that lentders and credit rating agencies are starting to look at the potential impact on a whole generation of borrowers. the ones who are supposed to have spending power and the early signs aren't good. a new study from transunion. average debt more than $23,000. up 30% in the past five years. more than half of all student loans now in deferral including payments deferred while the borrower is in school but also borrowers who get deferrals for financial hardship. delinquencies are up from five years ago. more than twice the delinquency rate for mortgages and more than ten time it is rate for credit cards. the problem isn't the level of student debt only. it's a that the job market is the worst in more than a decade for new grads. 50% unemployed or underemployed. >> that's a brutal report. my only thought listening to you and the numbers, are we headed for bailout nation? is this a taxpayer bailout? >> it looks bad. if you compare it to the housing market we are talking about a trilli
to the clinton administration when president clinton invited william cohen, a republican to be defense secretary. then the obama administration, president obama asked robert gates, a republican to be defense secretary. then there was leon panetta. and now another republican, chuck hagel. what's wrong with democrats being defense secretary? >> right. actually, just as an historical footnote, roberts used to be a republican. you know, i think that there's a sort of feeling that each one of these can be justified. i think president clinton and cohen had a good relationship, as does president obama and senator hagel. in gates' instance, that made a lot of sense. so much was going on that you didn't want to have an immediate change in the defense. but that is true, that it looks like democrats always want to appoint republican secretaries of defense. also if you look at the history of the independent councils, they have almost all been republicans. and as a democrat i sometimes get frustrated, too. we can't find an independent council in our own party. i can understand the frustration but the preside
identify whether or not they have this thing. elizabeth cohen in atlanta. why is this one so nasty this time around, elizabeth? >> soledad, it is the perfect storm for this particular stomach bug. so let's go over the three things that make this one really bad. first of all this particular strain, so new, it's called the sydney 2012. first spotted in sydney just last year, we're not immune to it. our bodies haven't seen it before. it comes on full force. highly contagious. just need one or two particles of this virus to get you sick. and a lot of people get this illness, they are contagious, but symptom free. they are not sick. running around making the rest of us sick. >> so disgusting. you know how i feel about those people. elizabeth cohen, thank you. listen, she and i agree on the purell thing. >>> the southeast getting a dose of the deep freeze with snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice expected from the carolinas to tennessee. even farther south. drivers in nashville, told don't travel if you don't have to. out west, the rare sight of freezing rain forced the runways at salt
prohibited abortions except to save the mother's life. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen returned to the state where it all began and spoke to both sides. >> reporter: roe v. wade originated in texas and 40 years later the situation here and in much of the u.s. is complex. on the one hand the governor has made this vow. >> my goal and the goal of many of those joining me here today is to make abortion at any stage a thing of the past. >> reporter: on the other hand, this is the reality. it's elizabeth at cnn. >> come on in. >> reporter: i'm at a health clinic in austin where seven women will have abortions today. >> do we have anymore all t ultrasounds? >> i don't think so. >> reporter: she offers a care that includes providing abortions to 9,000 women a year. >> my main goal is to provide an oasis where she feels safe and at peace. >> reporter: 72,470 women received abortions in 2011. in the u.s., nearly one in three women will have an abortion before the age of 45 according to the nonpartisan guttmacher institute. you have a lot more work to do? >> we have a lot more work to do
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
elizabeth cohen. that defies what a lot of people have thought in the past. what's the significance of this research? why is this? >> a lot of women and even some doctors think, hey, just take off the whole breast. a lot of doctors in the know will tell you, wait a minute. when someone's early stage breast cancer, stage one or stage two, lumpectomy plus radiation is the way to go. this study seems to support that. it suggests, it doesn't prove -- i don't want to use the p word. it suggests that having a lumpectomy and radiation is just as good or perhaps even a little better than having a mastectomy. >> i have a million more questions for you. i think the best thing would be for people -- you always say this -- ask your doctor first, right, elizabeth? >> ask your doctor what the options are. i've talked to so many women who have breast cancer and the doctor says let's do this. i say, well, did you ask him what other things you can do? there's almost always more than one option. if someone says i want to take your whole breast off, ask, what about a lumpectomy plus radiation? is that
cohen joins us live from atlanta. all of the talk this morning. what are exactly the dangers of these drugs? >> let's talk about where these drugs come from and why people use them. let's start with human growth hormone, mentioned in the story. human growth hormone is something we all naturally have. made basically in our pituitary glands. what it can do, it can reduce fat and increase muscle mass. but some of the dangers are it can cause bone and muscle pain, diabetes and heart diseasor increase the chance you will get those. let's talk about testosterone, also mentioned in the story. testosterone, a hormone both men and women have. and some people say if you take it, you get bigger, leaner, stronger, and when you have a big workout, it enhances your recovery. makes it easier to recover. but here are some of the dangers. it can increase the chances of getting all sorts of things from sleep apnea to heart disease if a man already has prostate cancer, may grow that existing prostate cancer. >> like lance armstrong's case. is it illegal for doctors to give these drugs to athlet
's bring in panel defense panel. lisa cohen. fox news legal analyst. this is all the work of mayor bloomberg. also known as nanny bloomberg. he loves to tell everybody what to do. what to eat and drink because is he smarter than everybody else. has he now crossed the line. 16-ounce sugary drink is banned? >> i mean, there is really no link between the soft drink -- let's say that soft drinks. there is lots of other drinks that are sugary but aren't banned. talking about sodas. what about vitamin drinks? there is so much flaw in the ban to begin with. it really doesn't rise to the level of legitimacy for it actually to hold water. >> gregg: this law when you look at it appears to be as fickle and fictitious. for example it doesn't include grocery stores. it doesn't include convenience stores. mercedes pointed out 7/11 home of the big gup is not included. unsweetened juice, milk braced drinks. doesn't the law demand fairness in equity? >> can i see what those points, why there is a disparity between the small businesses and the larger 7/11s. if someone doesn't want to buy it. if the
of massachusetts has selected his staff william cohen to temporarily fill kerry's u.s. senate seat. >>> outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton says she does not see herself getting back into politics. during a round of exit interviews, clinton says she will focus on public service, speaking and writing but she did not rule out a run for the white house in 2016. she says this whatever her decision, she's healthy and has a lot of energy. her last day on the job is friday. she says, though, she's looking forward to sleeping in on saturday. >>> 8:52. well, this morning, there are reports that boeing knew about problems with the batteries on its dreamliner jets before the battery fires earlier this month. all nippon said they had to change batteries on the dreamliners it owns on ten separate occasions for separate problems of. the airlines said they reported the problem to boeing. all 787s around the world were grounded after a battery fores and ana flight to make an emergency landing earlier this month. >>> and boeing a better than expected fourth-quarter earnings this month. we've been keeping
of state -- at leas for now. massachusetts governor patrick naming william cohen, his former chief of staff to the crary of state submitted his resignation last night. microsoft founder bill gates speaking out about immigration. we'll hear from him next. campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] sounds good. can youlyric can.aid do this? lyric can. lyric can. lyric by phonak is the world's only 24/7, 100% invisible hearing device. it's tiny. but that might be the least revolutionary thing about lyric. lyric can be worn 24/7 for up to four months, without battery changes. call 1-800-414-5999 for a risk-free trial. cookie: there's absolutely no way anyone can see it even if they get right up to my ear. michael: wake up, go to sleep...showering, running, all your activities. lyric can also give you exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your heari
's leading beverage company, we can play an important role. >> very interesting. elizabeth cohen joining us now. what is the meaning of this new ad campaign. >> they haven't said a lot about obesity even though people have harangued them saying, wait a second, you're selling this product that might be contributing to obesity. they're trying to say, look, we're aware of this problem and we're doing our part. for example they point out we're selling smaller sizes of coke, 7.5 ounces instead of 12. they say we have nearly 200 lee-calorie and no-calorie products. they also say we're starting to put our calories, you can see it right here on the silver band, 140 calories so you know what you're getting. so they say that they're really trying to help people make choices. they're encouraging exercise and they really hopes this sort of quiets down some of their critics. >> we've been talking about america's obesity problems for years and years. and soda, consumption, i believe, has been going downer of the the last several years f my question is then how responsible is soda really? >> if you look a
. wolf. >> elizabeth cohen with that report, thank you. >>> we can guarantee a harbaugh will coach the winning team in the super bowl. one of the best stories in the super bowl, even if the two coaches don't want to talk about it we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in tot
test underground. >>> also today, massachusetts governor duvall patrick named william cohen to serve as interim u.s. senator, thus replacing senator john kerry. cowan is the chief of staff. he will serve until kerry's successor is chosen in a special election. kerry was confirmed yesterday as secretary of state. >>> that 15-year-old pakistani school girl who was shot in the head by the taliban will undergo more surgery. malala will receive a titanium plate to repair her shattered skull. shown here. you see the big hole. and also she'll be getting a hearing device to replace her destroyed eardrum. the taliban shot malala in october, after she was speaking out in support of girls getting an education. the surgery will be performed in birmingham, england, where her father has now gotten a job with the pakistani consulate. >>> and stocks are taking a hit today, but that did not dampen the hype for research in motion's new phone, take a good long look at it here, the blackberry 10, the z-10 as it is officially called. came out today. it contains a new operating software that already has 7
of weeks. >> elizabeth cohen, thank you for that. appreciate it. >> thank you for bringing my home medical history on tv it was great. >> well, you shared it. it was really nasty too, folks. >> it was bad enough the first time. now we share it with america. >>> top trends on cnn.com. a murder mystery that turned washington, d.c. upside down. 2001. it was nuts. i was there. a brand new development in the chandra levy murder case. defense attorneys want a retrial. prosecutors withheld important information about a witness. we don't know which witness was involved, but defense attorneys say the government already had the information during the trial. 30-year-old ingmar guandice is serving a 60-year sentence after being convicted of murder. >>> crocodiles on the loose? are we going to see them. it's in south africa. some 1,500 crocodiles escaped from a reptile farm after it was flooded. half have been recaptured. one was located 75 miles away on a high school rugby field. one of the country's largest river, and now there are apparently a lot. >> a crocodile outbreak in south africa. >>> first
cohen to kind of explain this. i remember covering this story when he first fell into a coma and there was a lot of questions about whether or not he would be kept alive or taken off life support. what do they mean when they say he has responded to some of these things? what does that mean? >> i think they're intentionally using a vague word. it's not responding in the way that i'm responding to your question. it's not sort of that level. >> yeah. >> i spoke to a different israeli -- another israeli doctor who treated him. i'm going to quote his phrases. you have to do that in this situation. it is so specific to each individual patient. he said there was some kind of consciousness, some kind of processing was going on. that was the way he explained it. so let me give you some examples of what they did. dr. friedman sort of alluded to it a second ago. >> sure. >> they would show mr. sharon pictures of houses he wouldn't know, just random houses and theld then they would show him a picture of his own house. areas of his brain lit up that didn't light up with the random houses.
senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. what did doctors find in this new study? >> this is fascinating. doctors autopsied hundreds of men. they found the ones who were on beta blockers, very common blood pressure medications, had fewer signs of alzheimer's in their brains. fewer lesions. less atrophy. they think it might possibly be because it's good for the brain to have lower blood pressure. it sort of takes some of the stress off the brain. maybe that's why they had those findings. >> so explain exactly what a beta blocker is. does it mean people should routinely be taking beta blockers if they suspect they could come down with dementia or alzheimer's down the road? >> beta blockers block the effect of adrenaline which is what helps bring your blood pressure down. doctors said absolutely not, you should not be on a beta blocker unless you need it. if you don't need the beta blocker, it might cause your more medical problems then you started out with. now, if you do have high blood pressure, you can ask your doctor, hey, i'd like to start on a beta blocker, le
because -- >> that's right. >> you and google idea director jerry cohen are publishing a book called "the new digital age." can you give us an idea or preview on what the book is going to cover? i presume some of the things you have been talking about. >> we sat down over the last 18 mont, traveled around the world and talked to people about where they thought technology was going and more importantly, how society would adapt to it, a we came to the end of the book with a very optimistic view of this. a simple way of thinking about it, let's go back to the economist. it covers dictators, economic problems, corruption, technological innovation, health care issues and general sort of things. >> a google occasionally. >> last week. >> yes, we were on the cover and covered us as well. so let's go through each of those. how to you solve the back dictator problem? you empower the simpsons. unless the dictator is willing to some out down the internet and shoot everybody can they're getting desperate enough to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected coun
morning. >> steve: officer cohen, let's start with you, take us back to january 10, thursday. you guys were heading back to the cop shop and you saw something alongside the road. right? >> we were heading back from one of our elementary schools because we house of representatives at risk youth. so we were heading back to our station, we saw a dog lying on the side of the road on the sidewalk. we had a real brief discussion, you know, does he look hungry? you think he looks hung flee let's go get him some food. so we went, grabbed him some food, maybe a block away, came back, 'cause his ribs were sticking out. officer lancaster attempted to feed him. when he lifted his head up, he then cried, as if he was in pain. so we looked a little closer and we realized that his left leg was swollen and he had scratches all over him. >> steve: oh, my goodness. officer lancaster, we should point out that philly now is simply asleep. philly is on the road to recovery. so you would you know up taking -- how adorable. you call him philly because you named him after a sergeant from philly. tell us a lit
. is this what america wants? joining us for debate is stephan haste and sally cohen. he had also use big words. sit along by him on "special report." do you think that president obama is trying to undo reagan's legacy? we heard him talk so much about reagan when he was running for president, how much he looked up to him what did had on his mind something like where president reagan. president obama could make liberalism safe for america. could spread the gospel progressive values just as president reagan did with conservatism. i think it's working. to the extent that he is committed to doing it i think it's working. we remain a center right country. >> charles, do you agree with charles krauthammer and stephan hayes? this seems to be the moofl president obama is making or was it there all along. >> i'm confused as to which ronald reagan we are talking about. ronald reagan was the guy who gave amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants. raise taxes 11 times. and supported the brady gun violence bill. so there is is that ronald reagan. then there is the ronald reagan sort of fictional ronald
. also helping to shape where we went and what we did and his lead. i would defer with senator cohen's only in one word. that is that this crisis is unfolding not slowly. it is accelerating and exploding. there are now 650,000 refugees or more. 60,000 dead. those numbers are increasing exponentially in the night that we visited the day -- the night of the data we visited, there were between two and 3,000 refugees across the border as opposed to the average thousand the night before. so this problem far from going away or diminishing is actually exploding and increasing. destabilizing the entire region in turkey and jordan by imposing enhanced demands on their resources which the united states has had a historic obligation and opportunity. >> the children do farmed with dog seek aid ) said want to care for them. these features have been disrupted and changed forever by this war. relatives have been tortured and killed. may not comprehended right now, but their future will be transformed, and our future will be transformed. their future is in distinguishable from lars because. [indisce
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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